Dangerous Animals

Dangerous and Potentially Dangerous Dogs

An angry dog bares his teeth, ready to bite.Dangerous and potentially dangerous dogs are dogs that have been deemed dangerous by the police department due to bites or aggressive incidences that have been reported. The following definitions are used to define dogs as either potentially dangerous or dangerous.

A dog is defined as potentially dangerous under the following guidelines:

  • when unprovoked, inflicted bites that broke the skin on a human or domestic animal;
  • when unprovoked, chased or approached a person who was on public property in an apparent attitude of attack indicated by such things as snarling and bared teeth; or
  • has a known propensity, tendency, or disposition to attack unprovoked, causing injury or otherwise threatening the safety of humans or domestic animals.

A dog is defined as dangerous under the following guidelines:

  • without provocation, inflicts substantial bodily harm on a human being; or
  • kills a domestic animal without provocation while off the owner’s property; or
  • has been found to be potentially dangerous, and after the owner has notice that the dog is potentially dangerous, the dog aggressively bites, attacks, or endangers the safety of humans or domestic animals.

All dangerous dogs must be kept on a leash six feet long or less at all times when outdoors. If dogs are on the owner’s property, they may be kept in a fenced enclosure instead of on a leash. If you see a dangerous dog running loose, contact a Community Service Officer by calling 952.939.8500. All animal bites must be reported to the police department within 24 hours.